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5 Signs Your Resumé is Passé

5 Signs Your Resumé is Passé

Tania Khadder | GovCentral

September 16, 2009

#3: You write “References available upon request” at the bottom

Once again, a waste of valuable space. Do you really need to say so? The hiring manager can only assume that if they ask you for references, you’ll provide them. What, are you going to say “no?”

Instead, prepare a list of references with contact details and your relationship to each. Hold onto it until you’re further along in the selection process — you don’t want to annoy your references with repeated contact by employers who are less than serious about you. Most respectable employers wouldn’t bother to contact a reference until they are fully ready to make you an offer.

#4: You attach it to your email as a Word document

While you’re unlikely to be penalized for emailing a Word document, there’s a lot to be said for converting it to a PDF before sending.

A PDF document just looks neater. And even if you’ve gone crazy with the formatting, it will show up correctly on the hiring manager’s computer no matter what their settings, Word version, or font inventory. Besides, do you really want those squiggly red lines showing up under your former company’s name?

Stick to PDF. It’s the only surefire way to display your resumé exactly as you intended it.

#5: You list every job you’ve ever had in chronological order

In the olden days, the person with the most experience got the job.

Nowadays, the person who’s most talented, has the most relevant skill set, and has proven to be most valuable to his or her former employers gets the job.

If you want to be that person, make sure your resumé says so. Don’t list jobs that are irrelevant to the one you’re applying for just to fill up space. Instead, expand on the jobs that are relevant. Focus on measurable achievements in each role as opposed to a play-by-play of your daily responsibilities.

Learn More: 10 Worst Time Wasters at Work


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  • P1010003_max50

    charlesriggs

    about 2 years ago

    8 comments

    msgates not really wanting to join the Masons, but I was hoping to join the Illuminati.

  • P1010003_max50

    charlesriggs

    about 2 years ago

    8 comments

    So its like the i before e rule. " I before E, except after C, or when sounded as A, as in neighbor or weigh and on holidays and Saturday and May and I'll never be right no matter what I say.

  • Tessa_pic_cleanup_max50

    Tessa

    almost 3 years ago

    14 comments

    The objective sentence is not necessary however the title of the position applying for is important. It is now being called Target so as not to confuse and have people write needless goal sentence like the over used obnoxious one Seeking a job that will allow me to use my skills and abilities. That is definitely passe and out A objective really means what job are you after and some people have expertise in many areas and have had many jobs so they do need to spell out what they are looking for. Most cover letters are not even read. It needs to be on resume. I am a resume specialist and work for the state of California and have a MA in career counseling so I do know from what I speak.

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    msgates

    almost 3 years ago

    8 comments

    OH, and BTW, everything the author of this article wrote was "passé" within 30 seconds of completing it.

    The rules change by the minute. The way to get your resume read is to bypass the HR dept (unless you're an HR person) and get directly networked with the hiring manager. Use all of the tools at your disposal;

    NETWORK. NETWORK. NETWORK.

    Join organizations like Kiwanis, Junior Chamber, or Masons, or KofC--do good work for them and find who is a 'boss' that might need YOU, or might make a place for YOU. And, if you DO get the job, stay active in the organizations, because someone might need YOUR assistance one day, and you might need assistance again.

    Make sure most, if not all of your necessary certifications are current. Missing one is forgivable, missing 2 is survivable, 3+ and you're doomed.

    Get letters of recommendation as often as possible. Keep them on file to be sent out when necessary.

    Get copies of your college transcripts, scan them in and be prepared to attach them to an online application if the company or gov't org requires it. (most state gov't orgs in my state now REQUIRE your transcripts attached to your online app, a resume, a cover letter and 2 letters of recommendation before they will even process your app to see if you MIGHT be a candidate)

    You HAVE to try the front door of any organization. You MAY get lucky. But MOST positions are found going through the back door. And a few by climbing through the window. Temp at companies or agencies where you want to apply, if possible. Makes for GREAT contacts. I temped at one organization where they never removed me from the e-mail system, and I can still log in though the web client. Nobody sends me personal e-mail there any more, but in addition to all the announcements about company picnics and system outages, I get company internal vacancy announcements. They announce these 1 week before opening it up to the general public. I have the requirements READY TO GO as soon as the external open date comes up. I have sent 2 completed apps at midnight+30sec. Got me called for one phone interview.

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    amandahill

    over 3 years ago

    6 comments

    If you're right and all this stuff is passe, would you please tell the people at the Texas Workforce Commission? Since I've been on unemployment I've gone to lots of their workshops at the local job center, and they still tell me to do all this stuff on resumes. So who's right?

    And if you're not supposed to put it in a Word document or have an objective or limit it to one page, then how come lots of places still ask you to do that?

    I suggest to everyone reading this that they should take all this advice with a grain of salt. Try to figure out what the employer wants rather than what Monster says is the latest trend.

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    Account Removed

    over 3 years ago

    Colossal waste of time. All this is common sense. Looks like we got a visit from captain obvious. But when you think of the moral majority of people having the IQ of a slug these days, maybe this will be thought provoking to that segment of the population

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    Redtalon71

    over 3 years ago

    6 comments

    JerryGJones has brought to the fore some "real-time" points that are applicable today as they were " in 1994". He's correct in stating most electronic/omline career/job sites demand the Word formay. Perhaps because the companies they deal with have to justify the money they spent for scanning equipment or software which are all based on the Helvetica or Arial fonts for efficiency.

    As a Senior-level CAD Mechanical Designer/Drafter with over 35 years of experience, I can state categorically that the simple format I use, in Word format, includes my work history in four pages and has landed me a contract or "permanent"[FTE] position within 90 days(even during these trying times).

    Today's employers are being far more discerning about gaps in one's work history, so leaving out the "irrelevant job positions" as you called them can backfire on you and cause them to question your reliability and consistency.

    With many high-tech positions opening up in my own field I have to be sure the HR staff has a good idea to whom to direct my resume'. I do not need to be rejected out of hand because some harried HR rep didn't understand that I am an engineering designer NOT a design engineer. One has a degree, one does not...one gets higher salary than the other...but without pointing that out in the OBJECTIVE line resume's are constantly being misdirected to the wrong departments or managers...who subsequently throw it out rather than redirect it properly.
    Not every data system allows Adobe products onto their database. Certain IT personnel view it as a security threat potential of about 7 out of 10. Therefore PDFs are not as universal, and as Mr. Jones points out, real 'memory-hogs'.
    Yes, Tania, try quitting YOUR job and see how far your advice gets YOU! I'll stick with what has worked for more years than you've been ALIVE, thank you. Tried & true works better than you.

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    JerryGJones

    over 3 years ago

    62 comments

    Well, it's good that the old resume format is passe', but it's too bad the employers are still stuck in the old format. If you update your resume to the "new style", the employers look at it as being a rebel and throw it out.

    As for the PDF file, when your resume is in PDF format, the size is almost tripled, and every time I have sent a PDF (every time), the employer wrote back and asked for a WORD document.

    These tips may be the newest trend in magazines and online, but in the real-world job market, if you follow the new trends, you will just be asking for rejections.

    On the point of having no objective, this defeats the purpose of a government resume. Go to usajobs.com and they practically require an objective on every resume submitted.

    Tania, I think you need to quit your job and go job hunting. Only then will you find the truth about job hunting. You seem to be very out of touch with the job-hunting market. By the look of the large number of "thumbs down" responses, I think I am right.

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    MsWilburn

    over 3 years ago

    10 comments

    Never knew that listing your objective was a thing of the past. I would think that the interviewer could expound on this objective to direct them to other questions regarding the competencies of the applicant, go figure.

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    paula9891

    over 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Numerous articles discuss resumes updates for the "new age", but none give good suggestions on resume bulders (no fee), templates, that are crisp, clean and formatted properly. Any suggestions.....

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    lokensr

    over 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Looking at some of these posts makes me wonder how they have the jobs they have when TYPING in proper English, with proper spelling, is not something they seem to be "qualified" to do....

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    solababs

    about 4 years ago

    2 comments

    This is a perfect information. Hence, i am going to put those advices into consideration. Really appreciate your gesture. It will go along way. Thanks!

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    megmmahoney

    about 4 years ago

    2 comments

    "Great information! I had my resume in a PDF, however I had recruiter requests for me to send them a Word copy? Why would they want it in Word? Anything going on with recruiters that we should be aware of?"

    I had the same dilemma. The recruiter told me that she likes to be able to change the info. before sending out a resume. Usually recruiters will eliminate your contact info. so they can be contacted for you and that is not as easy to do with a resume in .PDF.

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    msroz8

    about 4 years ago

    18 comments

    *depend on

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    marlene1020

    about 4 years ago

    2 comments

    FYI...you CAN change a pdf with Adobe Professional. It matches the font and you cannot tell. I've done it so just because it's a pdf doesn't mean it can't be changed. And I, too, have had requests for an objective statement. Also, I have been asked for Word format so maybe it's a good idea to attach both a Word and a .pdf.

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