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Times to Go with Your Gut at Work

Times to Go with Your Gut at Work

Christina Macres | GovCentral

Ever get a hunch but can’t put your finger on why you feel the way you do? Perhaps it’s the way a coworker reacts to your proposal, or a strange feeling that your boss isn’t happy with your performance. Not everything can be worked out with a pro and con list. Much of working with people is following your intuition.

And not only do our bodies have a powerful language all their own, they’ve got quite a lot to say about what we should do in certain situations. Why not use this to your advantage in your professional career? Check out these work-related examples of times when your stomach might sour or your body tense and learn how to uncover your natural intuitive abilities just by listening to your body’s physical cues.

Career Change:

Point blank, career change is scary. Chances are, if the sheer amount of “what ifs” haven’t left your brain feeling completely noodle-like, your body is most probably screaming many conflicting thoughts, feelings and emotions due to it’s inability choose a resolution.

The solution? Simplify.

Researchers suggest concentrating your thoughts on a single question. Just by concentrating your feelings on a question like, “What do I need right now?” or “What outcome feels best at this time?” you can listen to your body’s feedback and get the intuitive information you need to make the decision that’s right for you and your career.

In-Office Gossip:

Who’s dating whom? Who’s promotion wasn’t deserved? Who’s tiptoeing out of the office a little to early each day? You don’t have to overhear water cooler chatter to know you’re the source of office gossip.

When faced with the nagging feeling that coworkers are getting a little too talkative, nip it in the bud – fast!

How? First, find the source. Then address the gossip. A good way of doing this is to speak to a time you overheard an untrue statement said about a fellow colleague.

For instance you could say, “Lately, I’ve been frustrated with the ways you’ve been talking about other people. I know these statements are false and I don’t believe these sorts of conversations promote a friendly work environment.” By confronting the source, you resolve two things: you take the attention off yourself and you also make your coworkers aware that, if this behavior should continue, everyone is at risk of being a the subject of gossip.

Speaking Up in a Meeting:

We all have different meeting personalities. There are some who feel comfortable chiming in whenever and wherever possible and then there are those who over-think their good idea, question, or quandary until it’s no longer relevant to the conversation. A quick way of knowing what’s appropriate meeting speak is to consult your gut. Most times if it’s not hurtful, unproductive or off-topic, it’s okay to bring it up in a meeting.

Going to HR:

Human Resources is available when things don’t feel right in the office. Do you have a bad feeling about one of your coworkers? Has someone been treating you unfairly or do you feel threatened by your current work environment? Take a trip to the HR person.

But how do you know when a gut feeling is warranted and not just indigestion? Your body’s physical messages should be “dear and neutral,” say researchers. And, they caution never to act on impulse, as, if you’re feeling particularly emotional, it could be fear and not intuition.

An exception to this would be in times of sexual or verbal harassment. If this is happening to you, be sure to contact your HR person as soon as the first offense. If someone is targeting you, they’re most certainly targeting others who may not know (or be brave enough) to speak up.


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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    RBrashears

    about 4 years ago

    6 comments

    Good tips for avoiding workplace conundrums.

  • Tublay__kapangan__kibungan_192_max50

    metot

    over 4 years ago

    3524 comments

    nice one

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